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Jeph Jerman/AMK

Split

>Two veterans of the avante-noise-cassette culture team up for this split release for rising micro-indie Cohort, and it's a definite winner. Jerman (best known for his recordings under the name Hands To) contributes '30 Minutes For Joe Jones'. His is a conceptual piece (dedicated to fluxus artist Joe Jones) recorded with a 22" wind gong, and played by a small fan. The sound is actually a splendid machine-drone that could almost be akin to David Jackman's work with Organum, but with more kinetic motion and less of a meditational nature. The metallic chimes reverberate nervously, but with an almost mystical opulence. Beautiful work and concept here, and a good listen, as well. Turntable and sound manipulator AMK contributes 2 pieces - first being the brief 4-minute 'Neither Odd Nor Neither', which is a bludgeoning kick of skipping discs and random loopiness. His other piece, the 17-minute 'Lying To Rest', is another loopy piece that sounds like field recordings of waterfowl collaged with natural 'found' sounds and looped vintage vinyl records. Disorienting and surreal, in a most appealing way. In summation, 'Split' is a fascinating an immersive set of experimental sounds that work well on both conceptual and aesthetic levels. Kudos to both artists for creating unique and individual sounds that inspire and provoke. And thanx to Cohort for releasing some consistently excellent sounds of late! (Goatsden)

>This has to be one of the finest instalments of Cohort's Split series; the only thing I really abhor is a mastering job that cuts the continuity of the drones, which - especially in Dronæment's case - is an utter shame. But the value of the music remains integral nonetheless. The Infant Cycle's three tracks are vaguely more dramatic, mechanically cyclical in a way; their foundations, which consist of cheap keyboards, trains, guitar and a Korg Poly 800 synthesizer, by some means attribute a compactness to the pieces that made me think of realities such as Esplendor Geometrico at first, soon vanishing to history when the spellbinding allure of the concoction takes full charge, putting the senses in a state of drowsy acceptance of the surrounding events. The second half of the disc sees Dronæment concerned with the management/looping of field recordings and the deployment of hissing tapes; he performs the task brilliantly, listeners at total ease amidst sources ranging from superb forest birds to human voices seamed and repeated ad infinitum. A sort of caressing psychedelic continuum that lulls into rational forgetfulness, definitely included in the best things I've heard from this artist. (Touching Extremes)

 

 

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